BOOKS

STEEP TEA (Carcanet Press, July 2015)
Nominated by the Financial Times as one of 2015's best books of poetry

Steep Tea is Singapore-born Jee Leong Koh's fifth collection and the first to be published in the UK. Koh's poems share many of the harsh and enriching circumstances that shape the imagination of a postcolonial queer writer. They speak in a voice both colloquial and musical, aware of the infusion of various traditions and histories. Taking leaves from other poets - Elizabeth Bishop, Eavan Boland and Lee Tzu Pheng, amongst others - Koh's writing is forged in the known pleasures of reading, its cultures and communities.

"The Singapore-born poet’s first UK publication is disciplined yet adventurous in form, casual in tone and deeply personal in subject matter. Koh’s verse addresses the split inheritance of his postcolonial upbringing, as well as the tension between an émigré’s longing for home and rejection of nostalgia." - Maria Crawford in UK's Financial Times

Buy from Carcanet Press or Amazon


Press and Reviews:
-Tse Hao Guang, Quarterly Literary Review of Singapore, Vol. 15 No. 1, Jan 2016
-Jennifer Wong, Asian Review of Books, 12 January 2016
-Mothership: 8 must-read Singaporean English fiction and poetry books of 2015
-Jerrold Yam, Christmas reading recommendations by members of The Poetry Society (UK)
-Split This Rock: 2015 Poetry Books We Love
-Gwee Li Sui, Jinat Rehana Begum, and Richard Angus Whitehead, Singapore Poetry's My Book of the Year 2015, December, 2015
-Maria Crawford, Financial Times, Best Books of Poetry of 2015, November 27, 2015
-Eshuneutics, Eshuneutics, November 2015
-Richard Scott, Ambit Magazine, October 2015
-Ian Pople, The Manchester Review, September 2015
-Anthony Huen, Cha: An Asian Literary Journal, September 2015
-Tara Bergin, POETRY magazine's Editors' Blog, September, 2015
-Carol Rumens, Poem of the Week, The Guardian, September 7, 2015
-Eric Forbes, Book Addict's Guide to Good Books, July 2015
-Akshita Nanda, "Poet Koh Jee Leong had to leave Singapore to engage with it," Sunday Times, March 15, 2015



SHADOWS OF JAPAN: IMAGES & WORDS
Photography by Guy E. Humphrey and Poetry by Jee Leong Koh

A record of Humphrey and Koh's visit to Japan in the summer of 2014, the folio features thirteen photographs and ten haiku responding to the beauty of Tokyo, Kyoto and Hakone. "For me, photography is not about capturing what we can easily seen. It is about finding the special moment that we will never see again. A shadow moving across the mountain ridge at morning's first light, a group of children's feet as they wait in line at the temple's gate. the steam rising from the cook's stove as our meal is being prepared. These are the moments that I remember, creating the emotional bond between a place and the context of my life. This is my reason for seeing." (from the Preface). 10x15, saddle-stitched, 23 pages, $15.00. Limited edition of 100. Available at select book fairs.






Now in an illustrated Japanese-English edition published by Awai Books (New York & Tokyo).

Inspired by the example of eleventh-century Japanese author and court lady Sei Shōnagon, Jee Leong Koh collects his miscellaneous jottings in his own pillow book. Written in the genre called zuihitsu, which comprises both prose and poetry, these observations, lists and anecdotes on life in Singapore and New York are, in turn, humorous, reflective, satirical, nostalgic and outrageous. They were penned for the author's own amusement. Perhaps they will amuse you as well. 

Amazon
Kindle








Inspired by the example of eleventh-century Japanese author and court lady Sei Shōnagon, Jee Leong Koh collects his miscellaneous jottings in his own pillow book. Written in the genre called zuihitsu, which comprises both prose and poetry, these observations, lists and anecdotes on life in Singapore and New York are, in turn, humorous, reflective, satirical, nostalgic and outrageous. They were penned for the author's own amusement. Perhaps they will amuse you as well. 

BooksActually



Reviews of The Pillow Book (Math Paper Press, 2012):
-Tiffany Tsao, Mascara Literary Review, Issue 15 - May, 2014
-Thow Xinwei, Quarterly Literary Review of Singapore, Vol. 12, No. 1, January 2013
-Eshuneutics, Eshuneutics, January 6, 2013
-Philip F. Clark, Lambda Literary, November 15, 2012
-Steve Fellner, Pansy Poetics, November 3, 2012
-Grady Harp, Poets and Artists #41 (December 2012)




Seven Studies for a Self Portrait, Jee Leong Koh's third book of poems, subjects the self to an increasingly complex series of personal investments and investigations. Ever-evolving, ever-improvisatory, the self appears first as a suite of seven ekphrastic poems, then as free verse profiles, riddles, sonnet sequences, and finally a divan of forty-nine ghazals. The discovery the book makes at the end is that the self sees itself best when it is not by itself.

Amazon








Reviews of Seven Studies for a Self Portrait (Bench Press, 2011):
-Mary Ann Sulliven, The Tower Journal, January, 2013
-Steve Fellner, Pansy Poetics, November 26, 2011
-Carol Chan,  Mascara, Issue 10 October 2011; my response
-Eshuneutics, Eshuneutics, Parts OneTwoThreeFourFiveSix and Seven.
-Nicholas Liu, Quarterly Literary Review of Singapore, Vol. 10 No. 3 July 2011
-Freke Räihä, Tidningen, Kulteren
-Grady Harp, Gently Read Literature, June 2011





"Jee Leong Koh is a vigorous, physical poet very much captured by the expressive power of rhythm, rhetoric, and the lexicon. He is also, paradoxically, a poet in pursuit of the most elusive and delicate of human emotions. The contradiction is wonderful and compelling, and so are his poems."
--Vijay Seshadri, author of The Long Meadow (Graywolf Press)








Reviews of Equal to the Earth (Bench Press, 2009):
-Quincy R. Lehr, Shit Creek Review, Issue 12
-Andrew Howdle, Boxcar Poetry Review, Summer 2010
-Mary Ann Sullivan, The Tower Journal, Winter 2009
-Andy Quan, Mascara Issue 7, May 2010
-Nicholas Liu, The Quarterly Literary Review of Singapore, April 2010
-Paul Stevens, The Chimaera, March 2010
-Jerry Wheeler, Out in Print, February 22, 2010
-Rob Mackenzie, Surroundings, December 30, 2009
-Moira Moody, Cha: An Asian Literary Journal, November 2009
-Grady Harp, O&S, November 2009
-Eshuneutics, Eshuneutics, August 14, 2009
-Robert Urban, Robert Urban Productions, February 7, 2009
-Christopher Hennessy, Christopher Hennessy, January 23, 2009




Payday Loans, Second Edition, published by Math Paper Press

With a critical introduction by Joshua Ip, and an interview with the author conducted by Chloe Yelena Miller for Eclectica Magazine.

BooksActually




Review of Payday Loans (Math Paper Press reissue, 2014):
-Tse Hao Guang, WeLoveBooksActaully, January 22, 2015






"Smart, irreverent, often unnerving, these sonnets smirk, smile, argue and bless. Jee Leong Koh has taken a month of days and rendered a very contemporary version of the artist as a young man. Cash in your paycheck and buy this book."
--Marie Howe, author of The Kingdom of Ordinary Time











Reviews of Payday Loans (Poets Wear Prada Press, 2007):
-Eshuneutics, Eshuneutics, February 10, 2008
-Tia Ballantine, Sphinx, issue 7, October 7, 2007
-George Held, Home Planet News, October 1, 2007
-James Midgley, Roundtable Review, July 2007
-Richard Marx Weinraub, A Gathering of the Tribes, June 2007