Monday, July 06, 2015

Tate Britain and Haiku

Saw the special Barbara Hepworth retrospective at Tate Britain yesterday. The exhibit showed her moving from early figurative works into abstract forms. The early abstractions explored single and double standing forms: self and relations. Both became interiorized, it seemed to me, in later abstractions that explored the relationship between her inner and outer worlds, in her response to the seascape of St. Ives, for instance. The later sculptures, often round in shape, were punctured or gorged with holes, as if to allow light (and eyes) in. At the same time, these holes functioned as framing devices, through which one could see the other side. One of the most powerful sculptures had a punctured ball sitting inside the puncture of another ball. It was also a fine example of her move late in her career into bronze, after working mostly with wood and marble.

Really enjoyed the show "New Brutalist Image 1949 - 1955: Hunstanton School and the Photography of Life and Art." The show highlights the collaboration of architects Alison and Peter Smithson, artist-photographer Nigel Henderson, pioneering structural engineer Ronald Jenkins and sculptor Eduardo Paolozzi. The show could also be called Structure and Materials. The room installation was centered by a long boxy steel structure, which housed glass cases displaying photographs, the architects' student works, their proposal for the school, notebooks, posters, and memorabilia. Mounted on the structure at different points, three projectors threw images onto the walls. The images from the first projector moved across a corner of the room, so the image was first seen frontally before it slanted and sped up on the next wall. Another projector threw a triptych of changing images of worksite materials, patterns found in urban areas, and children playing on streets. The last projector showed a slideshow of more abstract images. Small concrete slabs deeply incised with figures lay in a row along one wall. They were matched on the opposite end of the entrance by a long orange collage mural with multiple viewpoints. The architectural plans for the school - top and side views - were mounted on the wall, next to a video showing an interview with the project architect. The entire room gave me many ideas for the possible collaboration with Boedi Widjaja.

From the permanent galleries, Eric Gill's heart-stopping "Ecstasy" (1910 - 11) and Ivon Hitchens' "Autumn Composition, Flowers on a Table" (1932). The Henry Moore gallery was full of wonders of form and space.

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Hard to count
sheep in the shade
day dreams

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